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  #176  
Old 24th August 2020, 11:28
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Originally Posted by Farmer John View Post
Thanks FJ. They are going up in value now and collectible. There was one featured on the programme "Chasing Classic Cars".

Roy, on the above programme, CCC, The Judge GTOs are highly collectible and seen at many US auctions, as are all makes from the 'Muscle Car' era.

Getting back to GT40s, I only ever saw one on the road. I was driving through Much Wenlock, not far from where I lived in about 1969, when this orange beast came up behind and followed me into the town where it parked and a woman got out. I never thought that much of it until years later.
Being on shift at work, I had some part of every day free, so in the late '70s I started a mobile engine tuning business, similar to Hometune. I bought a used Crypton Tuner complete with exhaust gas analyser and I did quite well. One of the things I did was fit Weber Carb conversion kits.
One day I got a call by a woman to do a tune-up on a Ford. When I got there (Much Wenlock), I was met by a Mrs Childs (Glynis) who showed me into her garage and there was this bright orange GT40, reg No. B 33. I was a bit stunned, but she said that because I had advertised Weber conversions, could I tune the ones on this! I lifted the rear end (of the car!) and was faced with a set of 4 twin choke IDS Webers atop the 4.7 V8 Ford motor. Not that that was unexpected but it could have been just a 4 barrel Holley or similar, as was sometimes fitted to the 'road cars'. Anyway, I did the job but a request for me to road test it was refused! She was happy with it though. She had bought the car as a race car, Chassis No. 1073 but it was road registered. It had been owned by Alan Mann Racing and she had bought it from him. We kept in touch until I moved from the area. After meeting Glynis, I did see it race a few times at Oulton Park in club events, being driven by a Mike Wright.

JJ.
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  #177  
Old 24th August 2020, 17:10
Makko Mexico Makko is offline
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Originally Posted by BobClay View Post
Didn't they fit some Bond Bugs with the alloy Hillman Imp engine ?
They used to use the Imp engine in (those days) scrambler and sand racing side cars. One of the workshop technicians in Riversdale was building one and, watching him weld aluminium, I thought it looked very easy. He showed me the salient steps and set me up some offcuts to try. I CANNOT weld aluminium, full stop!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #178  
Old 24th August 2020, 17:57
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For "Bling" Mobiles or "Pimp my Ride", once, when visiting my sister-in-law in Philadelphia, she had to go somewhere on a weekend and arranged for me to borrow, from the Consulate, a pool car. It had been confiscated from a "drug lord". All chrome was gold plated and it was armoured. Additionally, it had diplomatic plates and couldn't get ticketed, as long as I didn't get out of the vehicle. Boy, did I draw a crowd and funny looks when I went IHOP on Saturday morning for breakfast! I think it was an 80's Le Baron, not the tops in the look stakes standard when new!
Rgds.
Dave
When all the other manufacturers were rapidly "down sizing" their cars in the 1970's and '80's, Chrysler were still advertising their "Beautiful New Yorker, it's the talk of the Town." They hired Jack Jones to sing in the TV commercials. The car was huge, dating from when Chrysler competed with Cadillac and Lincoln to put the biggest barge onto the roads!

A breakfast stack with Maple Syrup at the IHOP. Memories!
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  #179  
Old 26th August 2020, 13:15
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BobClay United Kingdom BobClay is offline
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More of a vintage vehicle 'concept' than for real. I noticed some similarities between Elon Musk's idea and those of the movie makers of 70 years ago. Destination Moon, which looked a lot wide of the mark when you consider the real Moon landing 19 years after the film was made.

But perhaps they weren't so far off target ....
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  #180  
Old 26th August 2020, 14:18
Phillthechill United Kingdom Phillthechill is offline
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Wink Probably----

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Originally Posted by BobClay View Post
You can't help but wonder if Brunel and Telford and Co are turning over in their graves.
----rotating at 40,000rpm Bob!Phil
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  #181  
Old 2nd September 2020, 19:21
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Greg Hayden United States Greg Hayden is online now
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1964-1/2 USA Ford Mustang

https://www.automobilemag.com/news/f...pecifications/
Quote
In the early 1960s, Lee Iacocca, vice president and general manager of Ford, envisioned a sporty youth-market car based on the compact Falcon. Developed in record time on a shoe-string budget, Ford introduced the 1965 Mustang at the World's Fair on April 17, 1964, to instant acclaim. Ford planned for 100,000 first-year sales, but dealers sold 22,000 on the first day. The Ford Mustang launched a whole new genre of automobiles, known as pony cars.
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More .....

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Ford marketed the original Mustang as a 1965 model, though Ford made several production changes to cars built after August 1964, by which time Ford had already sold 120,000. Hobbyists refer to early Mustangs as "1964½" models, while post-August cars are "late" 1965s.
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We were fitting out George M. Humphrey in Detroit - the former site of the Great Lakes Engineering Works that used to build and repair ships. After supper that Friday, a couple of car-loads of us went up town to the Delray Ford Dealer and I saw that red convertible like I eventually got.

A week later in Superior I ordered paying windshield sticker price $3,410 plus tax and title with the Superior WI Ford Dealer with a June delivery. Alas and alack my wheels were built on time. But then there was a nationwide new car transporter strike that was not settled until late in July so it was August before my wheels was delivered then I took two trips off - 10 days - on vacation.

Attached:

Ford-Dearborn-Line-E.jpg
Underneath the skin the 1964-1/2 Mustang was pure Ford Falcon and the Mustang's were built on the Falcon assembly line as this Ford photograph attests. There were only 2 engines a straight six of I believe 170 CID and the 260 CID V8 that I bought along with a manual 4 speed transmission with 4th being overdrive.

Mustang-4-1560-72.jpg
I took these four black & white Polaroid's August 1964 parked on the street in front of my parent's Duluth Minnesota home.

Mustang-Color-1560-72.jpg
The top two are copies of 1964 Ford ads.
The bottom left is the only evidence I had until I FINALLY found the bottom right picture taken by my Dad January 1965.

When I got the Mustang the top leaked - the dealer said "So what?" Frank Zbaracki recommended the Oldsmobile dealer and they fixed it - "ford had left some sealing off".

Frank Zbaracki owned and operated the Ramsey Oil Company gas station - NOT a "service" station as Frank often said. As a teenager I worked for Frank and he taught me a lot. For decades Frank was a Boy Scout leader and each summer he took his troop on a road trip to somewhere - one year it was Alaska. While Frank was gone I operated his station alone.

In Duluth with my folks after Christmas and New Years January 1965 I planned to leave and drive to Florida. I loaded my luggage into my wheels and was already to go, except the car did not want to go. The rear inner fender top was sitting on top of the rear tires.

I unloaded the wheels and went to see Frank Zbaracki who said "rear air-shocks go to the Chevy dealer" and gave me the name of the man to see. While those were being installed I saw a luggage rack mounted on a Vette trunk lid. And I wondered aloud if one would fit on my Mustang --- and a parts guy said yes and quoted the installed price and I told them to do it. $115 plus tax for the air shocks and luggage rack installed. Then I went to Florida.

The 1964-1/2 models V8 was the 260 CID (4.3L?)

https://www.automobile-catalog.com/m...dtop/1964.html

Quote

1964 Ford Mustang Hardtop 260 V-8 (man. 3) specs

Ford Mustang Hardtop 260 V-8 (man. 3) , model year 1964, version for North America U.S. (since April) (up to September)
manufactured by Ford (USA) in USA
2-door coupe body type
RWD (rear-wheel drive), manual 3-speed gearbox
gasoline (petrol) engine with displacement: 4267 cm3 / 260.4 cui, advertised power: 122 kW / 164 hp / 166 PS ( SAE gross ), torque: 350 Nm / 258 lb-ft, more data: 1964 Ford Mustang Hardtop 260 V-8 (man. 3) Horsepower/Torque Curve
characteristic dimensions: outside length: 4613 mm / 181.6 in, width: 1732 mm / 68.2 in, wheelbase: 2743 mm / 108 in
reference weights: base curb weight: 1307 kg / 2881 lbs
how fast is this car ? top speed: 181 km/h (112 mph) (©theoretical);
accelerations: 0- 60 mph 9.2© s; 0- 100 km/h 9.8© s (simulation ©automobile-catalog.com); 1/4 mile drag time (402 m) 17.2© s (simulation ©automobile-catalog.com) 1964 Ford Mustang Hardtop 260 V-8 (man. 3) Detailed Performance Review
fuel consumption and mileage: average estimated by a-c©: 15 l/100km / 18.8 mpg (imp.) / 15.6 mpg (U.S.) / 6.7 km/l, more data: 1964 Ford Mustang Hardtop 260 V-8 (man. 3).


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https://oldcarmemories.com/1964-12-f...y-the-victors/


Attached:
Ford-Dearborn-Line-E.jpg (138.6 KB)
Mustang-4-1560-72.jpg (149.8 KB)
Mustang-Color-1560-72.jpg (158.0 KB)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Ford-Dearborn-Line-E.jpg (138.6 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg Mustang-4-1560-72.jpg (149.8 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg Mustang-Color-1560-72.jpg (158.0 KB, 16 views)
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  #182  
Old 3rd September 2020, 10:06
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Greg. Nice to see you over here. Definitely "Mr Cool" in that last photo.

JJ.
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  #183  
Old 4th September 2020, 11:19
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Following on from Greg's post, his Mustang and my GT40 posts, I thought I'd mention about Ford and it's association with Holman & Moody. They were a NASCAR legend, building race cars and engines, almost exclusively for Ford, from the 1950s until the '70s. Apart from their NASCAR interests, they also prepared 50% of the GT40 Mk2s (427cu.inch engine) for endurance racing but particularly for the '66 to '69 LeMans. The other 50% were prepared by Carol Shelby of Mustang fame. The Mk1s (289 Mustang engine) were still prepared by Alan Mann Racing in England.
The book, "The Ford that Beat Ferrari" published in 1985, details everything about the GT40 programme but as I found out a few years ago, Holman & Moody retained all the official drawings and tooling information and licence for the Mk2 GT40s. That info remained idle, H&M not wanting to 'dilute' the family of known GT40s in ongoing classic and vintage sports car racing. That is until a few years ago, the H&M company now owned by Ralph Moody's son, decided to build a limited number of the GTs, identical in almost every respect to the LeMans winning cars. Their chassis numbers following on, adding to the list of official production cars, allowing them to race in the above mentioned races. Some of the original 1960s workers are among the present build team. Price $1.5m and to order only.
Holman & Moody have their factory in Charlotte, North Carolina, where they produce modded versions of most Ford vehicles, and especially Mustangs. They have a website, and are mentioned in others, which I have had no luck in posting here(!!!), so Google "Holman & Moody Shop Tour", if you are at all interested in more info.

JJ.
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  #184  
Old 4th September 2020, 18:18
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Did Holman & Moody also have some engines marinised for offshore powerboats John? I vaguely recollect that some of the American boats of the 1960's had them installed. The name is ringing a distant bell!
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  #185  
Old 5th September 2020, 10:11
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Yes Roy, one of their multitude of interests was Off-Shore racing providing, I guess Ford motors, knowing their close relationship with the factory. They also provided modified Ford Falcons for European rallies and Mustangs, Fairlanes and Galaxies for the British Saloon Car races - pre BTCC. That is, until the Lotus Cortinas came along and out-handled the big Fords. No surprise there!

JJ.
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  #186  
Old 5th September 2020, 12:46
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Thanks John, I knew I wasn't cracking up! I can recall that Ford had some quality issues with their V8 motors in their passenger cars in the 1970's. I think they had tried to reduce wear in the bores by treating them with a chemical that would aid lubrication on first start in a winter morning. It wasn't successful and they had to honour an awful lot of warranty repairs due to the new idea actually increasing wear significantly. A friend had a Ford LTD station wagon that left a blue haze behind, even when up to temperature. It only had about 60,000 miles on the clock at the time. His later Torino wagon was ok though, as whatever the problem was, Ford had cured it.
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  #187  
Old 6th September 2020, 14:44
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Originally Posted by Dartskipper View Post
Thanks John, I knew I wasn't cracking up! I can recall that Ford had some quality issues with their V8 motors in their passenger cars in the 1970's. I think they had tried to reduce wear in the bores by treating them with a chemical that would aid lubrication on first start in a winter morning. It wasn't successful and they had to honour an awful lot of warranty repairs due to the new idea actually increasing wear significantly. A friend had a Ford LTD station wagon that left a blue haze behind, even when up to temperature. It only had about 60,000 miles on the clock at the time. His later Torino wagon was ok though, as whatever the problem was, Ford had cured it.
I've never heard about that Roy but not the first time Ford dropped a proverbial!

A couple of anecdotes about Ford but in racing.

When Ford produced the 427 engine it was well over engineered, but expensive to manufacture. They needed more power to try and beat Chrysler's Hemi and Richard Petty in NASCAR; So, in conjunction with Holman & Moody, they developed an overhead cam version(SOHC) of that 427 dubbed "The Cammer". Ford had to produce 500 to get it accepted for racing which they did. On it's first outing in the first race of the season, they beat the Hemis and the rest of the field, hands-down.
After the race, NASCAR officials told H&M, "OK you've had your fun, don't bring it back" and banned it. So...there were now 500 Cammers of no use! The motors were eventually used in Drag Racing events and off-road rallying.
All this expense for Ford was Chicken-feed - Holman & Moody's money from Ford averaged $14m a year and that in the 1970s. This allowed H&M to charge race teams only $1 per complete car supplied, with the guarantee of the teams getting their $1 back on it's return to H&M, no matter the condition!!

JJ.
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  #188  
Old 18th September 2020, 15:06
Jolly Jack Jolly Jack is offline
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Early car phone.

A bit of history. The photo shows the boot (trunk) of an American car full of electronics and a racing slick spare tyre!!
The electronics are for the early development of a car phone - 1946.

JJ.
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