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After the sea, the land.

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  #26  
Old 14th July 2018, 14:25
Harry Nicholson United Kingdom Harry Nicholson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave McGouldrick View Post
"Better than being down the pit."


A little off topic but that reminded me of Lisa Tarbuck a few years ago on the radio.
She was talking to a US performer who was bemoaning the hassles and tribulations of being 'on the road'.
" It's not exactly working down a coal mine is it?" she said

My gt grandfather, Matthew, who was a touch wild by all accounts, was trapped in South Hetton Coliery in Co Durham. He prayed to God that if he got him out he would mend his ways. He got out. mended his ways, went on the wagon, joined the Sally Army and became an officer. I never met him, but I recall that his son grew splendid leeks.
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  #27  
Old 8th September 2018, 20:43
janmike United Kingdom janmike is offline
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janmike, Had a few goes at swallowing the anchor. After seving with British Tanker Co. Came ashore and worked for Britsh European Airways in the crew room at LHR. Rapidly got fed up with commuting so joined SMBP coasters. Had a great time but very long hours 56 hrs basic then a minimum of 38 hrs overtime. Saw an advert for working for an American company in the Libyan desert. Found I drank too much so then worked in the UK as a Work study engineer, moving onto being an industrial engineer in the electronics industry. When the big slow down happened in 1974 I joined Shell Tankers and stayed with them until made redundant in 1992.
Found a job as assistant harbourmaster in Torbay and temporary teacher for White fish authority. Retired in 1995. Did a couple of years as a parish councillor then moved to France for a couple years. Settled down now in sunny Devon
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  #28  
Old 11th September 2018, 09:41
Harry Nicholson United Kingdom Harry Nicholson is offline
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After thirty years in TV studios and with the march of miniaturisation the work had become a bore to the engineer in me. The company waved attractive redundancy offers to get rid of 'surplus' staff, so I took it and moved close to Robin Hood's Bay. Spent two years in a boiler suit doing up the cottage and making craft items for galleries. I'm still making art enamels with a kiln, fusing glass onto copper. I went to local writing classes and eventually published two historical novels set in NorthEast England. Lately I'm writing memoir vol 2 of the seagoing days - oh how I miss those times.
Then there's the garden and my effort to grow leeks that will meet with less derision from the kitchen. I should get a dog really, but now that hedgehogs have appeared in the garden (I feed them each night) and occupied the shelters I've set out, I've probably got enough to look after.
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  #29  
Old 14th September 2018, 08:42
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BobClay United Kingdom BobClay is offline
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Further to my previous post I actually did present a few courses, evening courses for adults, at the Devon Community College where I worked.
These were usually science based but I did do one on basic desktop computer maintenance. I was surprised at how many takers there were. During the first lesson I was required to do some safety presentations, which really comprise of saying there are no dangerous voltages in a desktop computer other than in that grey box with a fan that the mains lead plugs into. If that goes wrong and you're not sure, unplug it, undo four screws ... and replace it.

However I did present a small lesson on what the meaning of voltage and current is. For people in general this requires a good visual demonstation. I used a car battery, a piece of mains fuse wire and a large pair of gloves. First off, wrap each end of the fuse wire around a nail and holding the nails with your gloves, short out the car battery. Very impressive visual sight of fuse wire glowing white hot and melting.
Then I'd tell them that the 12 volts provided by the car battery is the highest DC voltage you'll find in a computer, and it's quite harmless, please come up and stick the finger of one hand on one battery terminal, and the finger of your other hand on the other terminal.
Strangely, having seen the fuse wire all but vaporised, no-one volunteered. So I'd stick my fingers onto the battery terminals and pretend to get a powerful shock, then burst out laughing at their distress.
It probably didn't teach them much, but I got a laugh !!

"That's the safety bit over," I told them. "Twelve volts wont hurt you, but if that grey box with the mains plug isn't working, don't go inside it unless you're qualified. With regard to mains voltages remember that line from the film The Terminator: "It can't be bargained with. It can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop... ever, until you are dead!"

Then I let them loose on a number of old classroom computers we had left over from a refit. (The basic internals of a desktop haven't changed much in terms of layout since I did this course in the early 2000's. The various bits have just got more powerful and faster, and the fans must be breeding in there )

I think the course was successful because I was asked to do a couple more. But I abandoned the battery demonstration because heaving the bloody thing up the stairs almost did my back in.
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